The Goals Of Our Curriculum

The most important goal of our early childhood is to help children become enthusiastic learners. this means encouraging children to be active and creative explorers who are not afraid to try out their ideas and to think their own thoughts.
Our goal is to help children become independent, self-confident, inquisitive learners. we are teaching them how to learn in an environment that is developmentally appropriate. we are allowing them to learn at their own pace and in the ways that are best for their developmental level.
We are giving them good habits and attitudes, particularly a positive sense of themselves, which will make a difference throughout their lives.

Our curriculum identifies goals within the following domains for early childhood development:

  • SOCIAL: To help children feel comfortable in school, trust their new environment, make friends, and feel they are part of the group.
  • EMOTIONAL: to help children experience pride and confidence, develop independence and self-control, and have a positive attitude toward life.
  • COGNITIVE: to help children become confident learners by letting them try out their ideas, and experience success, and by helping them acquire learning skills such as the ability to solve problems, ask questions, and use words to describe their ideas, observations and feelings.
  • PHYSICAL: to help children increase their large and small muscle skills and feel confident about what their bodies can do.
  • LANGUAGE/LITERACY: to help children hear and discriminate sounds of language and interpret oral direction then actively participate in conversation. With this interrelation towards the value of spoken words to reading and then developing print concepts and the never ending enjoyment of books.

 

The activities we plan for children, the way we organize the environment, select toys and materials, plan the daily schedule, and talk with children, are all designed to accomplish the goals of our curriculum and give the children a successful start in school.

DISCIPLINE POLICY- Working to support your child for success

The foundation of our discipline policy is rooted in Positive Discipline procedures.

An important aspect of a good Early Childhood Education program is to promote skills that support healthy social and emotional development. One important aspect in this critical area of development is to educate children on how to manage their feelings and actions in ways that are considered socially acceptable. We recognize that conflicts and inappropriate acting-out are inevitable during the formative years of childhood and thus understand that children need help in developing skills that relate to managing conflicts and emotions. In fact, we view most behavior problems as valuable teaching/learning opportunities for helping children to find more appropriate ways to express themselves. 

 As opposed to the short-term solutions of a reward and punishment system we promote empowering children to manage their feelings in ways that are more effective over the long-term. By teaching Positive Discipline strategies, children learn how to manage their feelings and frustrations without resorting to physical or verbal aggressive behaviors.  Through a gradual process of role-modeling and positive reinforcement, children learn how to take care of their own needs (self-respect) without disrespecting the feeling and rights of other (respect for others). This important foundation will support them beyond pre-school and help them in establishing life-long skills throughout school and into adulthood.

We also recognize that there are occasionally behavioral issues outside of the appropriate developmental and age continuum for socially accepted behavior. For example; behavior that results in ongoing classroom management problems such as disruptive or aggressive acting out that causes concern for the well-being of the student and/or other students, will be addressed individually.  At such times we will share our observations and concerns with parents to determine if the problem is something we can work on together or if we need to seek the advice and counseling from an outside professional agency.

The B.C. curriculum at the elementary level begins by exploring the individual’s own identity and family. As the students move through Grades 1 – 7 they learn about their community and the varied cultures within that community. With an understanding of their own environment, they are better able to understand other societies and cultures.

The math and science programs at the elementary level in B.C. follow in a similar way as students move from simple concepts and processes to more complex problem solving and higher order thinking. With English being the language of instruction, our elementary program stresses not only reading comprehension but writing in all genres.

As the students move through the British Columbia elementary school grades, social responsibility and global citizenship is taught, modeled and practiced. These are integrated into the different subjects and students are given many opportunities to practice their skills. Healthy living and healthy choices are core to not only the physical education program but the school community itself.

The Secondary Program is referred to as the ‘Graduation Program’ in B.C. schools and leads to the graduation certificate which is referred to as the ‘Dogwood’ certificate. This certificate is issued by the B.C. Ministry of Education and indicates that the student has successfully completed all of the required courses with a minimum of 80 credits as well as Grad Transitions. It should be noted that all of our students graduate with far more credits than the minimum.

The Graduation Programs includes the grades from 10 – 12 and involve Provincial Examinations that all students will be required to write and will be used for admission into universities. The required exams include English 10, Science 10, Foundations of Math and Pre-Calculus 10, Social Studies 11, and English 12.

At BCCIS we have a wide selection of courses that are available to our students depending upon post secondary/career goals.

BCCIS is now offering Advanced Placement (AP) courses at the grade 12 level. AP courses are university level courses that you take in grade 12. Upon successful completion of the AP exams (taken in May of each year), you will receive credit not only toward your graduation certificate but also toward first year university courses.

AP courses can help you acquire the skills and habits you’ll need to be successful in higher education. You’ll improve your writing skills, sharpen your problem-solving abilities, and develop time management skills, discipline, and study habits. In AP classrooms, the focus is not on memorizing facts and figures but on intense discussions, solving problems collaboratively, and learning to write clearly and persuasively.

AUC and most universities and colleges in the United States as well as more than 60 other countries give students credit, advanced placement or both on the basis of AP Exam scores. By entering university with AP credits, you’ll have the time to move into upper level courses. For example if you receive a 4 or a 5 on the final AP European History course, you will receive 3 credit hours for HIST 203 and 3 credit hours for HIST 204 at AUC. AP Biology earns you 4 credits hours for BIOL 104 at AUC.

AP course curricula are developed by the College Board (http://www.collegeboard.com) in the United States and the exams are created and marked by members of the College Board. The exams are scored on a scale of 1 to 5. Students who write the AP exam in May for a subject will not have to write a final school exam in that subject. If a student does not receive a score that allows for credit at university, but passes the course; s/he may still receive credit for the course on their graduation certificate.

Our vision for teaching Arabic at British Columbia Canadian International School is to achieve leadership and excellence in teaching & publishing Arabic in educational, research and entertainment contexts. We also want to encourage and stimulate the creative energies of the students through:

  1. A safe learning environment that promotes creative and scientific thinking.
  2. A comprehensive curriculum based on the standards of the Ministry of Education and that applies general international education methods and the Canadian education.
  3. The diversity of teaching and learning methods.
  4. The application of systematic and extracurricular activities to enrich the educational process and meet the educational and psychological needs of students.
  5. Teachers that are experts at dealing with students from kindergarten age to the age of university.
  6. Strategies for evaluation are used to determine the strengths and weaknesses of the students and the educational process generally.
  7. An effective partnership with parents in decision making to serve the message and vision of the school.

الرؤية العامة لتدريس اللغة العربية والدراسات الاجتماعية

يرنو القسم إلى تحقيق الريادة والتميز في مجال تدريس و نشر اللغة العربية نشرا تعليميا بحثيا وترفيهيا مع تشجيع وتحفيز الطاقات الإبداعية لدى الطلاب من خلال :

بيئة تعليمية آمنة و محفزة تعزز التفكيرالإبداعي والعلمي .

مناهج شاملة مبنية على معايير وزارة التربية والتعليم و التطبيق عليها بنفس طرق تطبيق التعليم الدولي عامة والكندي بصفة خاصة

التنوع في طرق التدريس و التعلم .

تطبيق أنشطة منهجية و لا منهجية تثري العملية التعليمية و تلبي الاحتياجات النفسية و التعليمية للطلاب

هيئة تدريسية تملك الخبرة و أساليب التعامل مع الأطفال من سن رياض الاطفال حتى سن الجامعة

استراتيجيات للتقييم يتم استخدامها لمعرفة جوانب القوة و الضعف لدى الطلاب و العملية التعليمة ككل

شراكة فعالة مع أولياء الأمور  في اتخاذ القرار لخدمة رسالة و رؤية المدرسة

+ ECE Program

The Goals Of Our Curriculum

The most important goal of our early childhood is to help children become enthusiastic learners. this means encouraging children to be active and creative explorers who are not afraid to try out their ideas and to think their own thoughts.
Our goal is to help children become independent, self-confident, inquisitive learners. we are teaching them how to learn in an environment that is developmentally appropriate. we are allowing them to learn at their own pace and in the ways that are best for their developmental level.
We are giving them good habits and attitudes, particularly a positive sense of themselves, which will make a difference throughout their lives.

Our curriculum identifies goals within the following domains for early childhood development:

  • SOCIAL: To help children feel comfortable in school, trust their new environment, make friends, and feel they are part of the group.
  • EMOTIONAL: to help children experience pride and confidence, develop independence and self-control, and have a positive attitude toward life.
  • COGNITIVE: to help children become confident learners by letting them try out their ideas, and experience success, and by helping them acquire learning skills such as the ability to solve problems, ask questions, and use words to describe their ideas, observations and feelings.
  • PHYSICAL: to help children increase their large and small muscle skills and feel confident about what their bodies can do.
  • LANGUAGE/LITERACY: to help children hear and discriminate sounds of language and interpret oral direction then actively participate in conversation. With this interrelation towards the value of spoken words to reading and then developing print concepts and the never ending enjoyment of books.

 

The activities we plan for children, the way we organize the environment, select toys and materials, plan the daily schedule, and talk with children, are all designed to accomplish the goals of our curriculum and give the children a successful start in school.

DISCIPLINE POLICY- Working to support your child for success

The foundation of our discipline policy is rooted in Positive Discipline procedures.

An important aspect of a good Early Childhood Education program is to promote skills that support healthy social and emotional development. One important aspect in this critical area of development is to educate children on how to manage their feelings and actions in ways that are considered socially acceptable. We recognize that conflicts and inappropriate acting-out are inevitable during the formative years of childhood and thus understand that children need help in developing skills that relate to managing conflicts and emotions. In fact, we view most behavior problems as valuable teaching/learning opportunities for helping children to find more appropriate ways to express themselves. 

 As opposed to the short-term solutions of a reward and punishment system we promote empowering children to manage their feelings in ways that are more effective over the long-term. By teaching Positive Discipline strategies, children learn how to manage their feelings and frustrations without resorting to physical or verbal aggressive behaviors.  Through a gradual process of role-modeling and positive reinforcement, children learn how to take care of their own needs (self-respect) without disrespecting the feeling and rights of other (respect for others). This important foundation will support them beyond pre-school and help them in establishing life-long skills throughout school and into adulthood.

We also recognize that there are occasionally behavioral issues outside of the appropriate developmental and age continuum for socially accepted behavior. For example; behavior that results in ongoing classroom management problems such as disruptive or aggressive acting out that causes concern for the well-being of the student and/or other students, will be addressed individually.  At such times we will share our observations and concerns with parents to determine if the problem is something we can work on together or if we need to seek the advice and counseling from an outside professional agency.

+ Elementary Program

The B.C. curriculum at the elementary level begins by exploring the individual’s own identity and family. As the students move through Grades 1 – 7 they learn about their community and the varied cultures within that community. With an understanding of their own environment, they are better able to understand other societies and cultures.

The math and science programs at the elementary level in B.C. follow in a similar way as students move from simple concepts and processes to more complex problem solving and higher order thinking. With English being the language of instruction, our elementary program stresses not only reading comprehension but writing in all genres.

As the students move through the British Columbia elementary school grades, social responsibility and global citizenship is taught, modeled and practiced. These are integrated into the different subjects and students are given many opportunities to practice their skills. Healthy living and healthy choices are core to not only the physical education program but the school community itself.

+ The Secondary Program

The Secondary Program is referred to as the ‘Graduation Program’ in B.C. schools and leads to the graduation certificate which is referred to as the ‘Dogwood’ certificate. This certificate is issued by the B.C. Ministry of Education and indicates that the student has successfully completed all of the required courses with a minimum of 80 credits as well as Grad Transitions. It should be noted that all of our students graduate with far more credits than the minimum.

The Graduation Programs includes the grades from 10 – 12 and involve Provincial Examinations that all students will be required to write and will be used for admission into universities. The required exams include English 10, Science 10, Foundations of Math and Pre-Calculus 10, Social Studies 11, and English 12.

At BCCIS we have a wide selection of courses that are available to our students depending upon post secondary/career goals.

+ Advanced Placement (AP)

BCCIS is now offering Advanced Placement (AP) courses at the grade 12 level. AP courses are university level courses that you take in grade 12. Upon successful completion of the AP exams (taken in May of each year), you will receive credit not only toward your graduation certificate but also toward first year university courses.

AP courses can help you acquire the skills and habits you’ll need to be successful in higher education. You’ll improve your writing skills, sharpen your problem-solving abilities, and develop time management skills, discipline, and study habits. In AP classrooms, the focus is not on memorizing facts and figures but on intense discussions, solving problems collaboratively, and learning to write clearly and persuasively.

AUC and most universities and colleges in the United States as well as more than 60 other countries give students credit, advanced placement or both on the basis of AP Exam scores. By entering university with AP credits, you’ll have the time to move into upper level courses. For example if you receive a 4 or a 5 on the final AP European History course, you will receive 3 credit hours for HIST 203 and 3 credit hours for HIST 204 at AUC. AP Biology earns you 4 credits hours for BIOL 104 at AUC.

AP course curricula are developed by the College Board (http://www.collegeboard.com) in the United States and the exams are created and marked by members of the College Board. The exams are scored on a scale of 1 to 5. Students who write the AP exam in May for a subject will not have to write a final school exam in that subject. If a student does not receive a score that allows for credit at university, but passes the course; s/he may still receive credit for the course on their graduation certificate.

+ Arabic Studies

Our vision for teaching Arabic at British Columbia Canadian International School is to achieve leadership and excellence in teaching & publishing Arabic in educational, research and entertainment contexts. We also want to encourage and stimulate the creative energies of the students through:

  1. A safe learning environment that promotes creative and scientific thinking.
  2. A comprehensive curriculum based on the standards of the Ministry of Education and that applies general international education methods and the Canadian education.
  3. The diversity of teaching and learning methods.
  4. The application of systematic and extracurricular activities to enrich the educational process and meet the educational and psychological needs of students.
  5. Teachers that are experts at dealing with students from kindergarten age to the age of university.
  6. Strategies for evaluation are used to determine the strengths and weaknesses of the students and the educational process generally.
  7. An effective partnership with parents in decision making to serve the message and vision of the school.

الرؤية العامة لتدريس اللغة العربية والدراسات الاجتماعية

يرنو القسم إلى تحقيق الريادة والتميز في مجال تدريس و نشر اللغة العربية نشرا تعليميا بحثيا وترفيهيا مع تشجيع وتحفيز الطاقات الإبداعية لدى الطلاب من خلال :

بيئة تعليمية آمنة و محفزة تعزز التفكيرالإبداعي والعلمي .

مناهج شاملة مبنية على معايير وزارة التربية والتعليم و التطبيق عليها بنفس طرق تطبيق التعليم الدولي عامة والكندي بصفة خاصة

التنوع في طرق التدريس و التعلم .

تطبيق أنشطة منهجية و لا منهجية تثري العملية التعليمية و تلبي الاحتياجات النفسية و التعليمية للطلاب

هيئة تدريسية تملك الخبرة و أساليب التعامل مع الأطفال من سن رياض الاطفال حتى سن الجامعة

استراتيجيات للتقييم يتم استخدامها لمعرفة جوانب القوة و الضعف لدى الطلاب و العملية التعليمة ككل

شراكة فعالة مع أولياء الأمور  في اتخاذ القرار لخدمة رسالة و رؤية المدرسة